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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Experimental evaluation of school-based HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa

    School-based adolescent health education programs represent a durable strategy in reducing the spread of HIV because they can leverage pre-existing social and organizational structures to reach large fractions of students at critical life stages. Many evaluations of school-based HIV programs draw on multilevel study designs that assign schools to treatment conditions or assign students to treatment conditions within blocks defined by school membership. …

  2. Rising school enrollment and declining HIV and pregnancy risk among adolescents in Rakai district, Uganda, 1994–2013

    Background: Poverty, family stability, and social policies influence the ability of adolescents to attend school. Likewise, being enrolled in school may shape an adolescent’s risk for HIV and pregnancy. We identified trends in school enrollment, factors predicting school enrollment (antecedents), and health risks associated with staying in or leaving school (consequences). Methods: Data from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS) were examined for adolescents 15–19 years (n = 21,735 person-rounds) from 1994 to 2013. …

  3. ECD and the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa

    An unprecedented number of young children in Sub-Saharan Africa are being adversely affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, yet programs specifically designed to meet the developmental needs of orphaned and vulnerable children (OVC) from birth to age 8 are rare. This article summarizes the daunting array of challenges facing young OVC in Sub-Saharan Africa, and profiles research and action projects undertaken by four members of the inaugural graduate-level cohort of the ECDVU to promote high-quality developmentally appropriate ECD care for young OVC in their respective countries. …

  4. Talk what others think you can’t talk: HIV/AIDS clubs as peer education in Ugandan schools

    In this article, we make the case that HIV/AIDS clubs in Ugandan schools provide valuable information to students who may not have easy access to health services. As one club motto suggests, the clubs ‘talk what others think you can’t talk’. The innovative peer education methods, which include drama, popular culture and community outreach all have great appeal to youth, and provide unique opportunities for female students to raise gender issues and develop leadership skills. …

  5. The socioeconomic impact of HIV/AIDS on education outcomes in Uganda: School enrolment and the schooling gap in 2002/2003

    Due to high prime-age mortality—a result of HIV/AIDS, the number of orphans in Uganda continues to rise. Using the 2002/2003 Uganda National Household Survey, this paper investigates how HIV/AIDS orphan status affects schooling enrolment and grade progression. Our results show that HIV/AIDS orphans are not significantly less likely to continue schooling but are by far more likely to fall below their appropriate grade. …

  6. Evidence, politics and Uganda's HIV success: moving forward with ABC and HIV prevention

    Uganda’s HIV success story has become increasingly focused around the idea of ‘ABC’ (Abstain, Be faithful or use Condoms). During the George W. Bush administration, the US Government has promoted one specific ABC model for its development agencies, with a particular emphasis on abstinence. Yet other actors have contested this view. To understand Uganda’s success, it is imperative to look at what ABC was in Uganda when critical changes in behaviour were occurring. …

  7. Young people's perspectives on the adoption of preventive measures for HIV/AIDS, malaria and family planning in South-West Uganda: focus group study

    The aim of the study was to explore young people's understanding and knowledge about why protective measures against HIV/AIDS, malaria and unplanned pregnancy are not taken by those at risk in Uganda. The study results were that the participants (all from secondary school in Kanungu Uganda) could identify reasons why preventive action was not taken. These reasons included misconceptions, the inpracticability of abstinence, and fear of side effects of several key interventions. The article argues that there is an apportunity to improve preventive measures by tackling these issues. …

  8. Young people and sexual agency in rural Uganda

    Drawing on definitions of agency from within the international development literature, the author focuses on decision-making processes leading to young people's involvement in relationships; actions undertaken to maintain secret relationships in contexts where young people's sexual agency is generally prohibited; transactional and gendered negotiations between young people involved within a relationship; and a range of outcomes arising from young people's sexual activity. …

  9. The ABC's of HIV prevention: education in Uganda and Côte d'Ivoire

    Abstince-only education programs in the United States have been controversial since their inception in 1981 because of their lack of efficacy and because of the sexualities and behaviors that they promulgate. Barack Obama's 2010 budget eliminates federal funding for abstinence-only education programs in the US; however, the outline of his five-year strategy for the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) does not indicate whether the US government will continue to mandate abstinence-only education in so-called "focus countries", primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. …

  10. HIV/AIDS related knowledge and perceived risk associated with condom use among adolescents in Uganda

    While considerable attention has been paid to sexual behaviors among HIV high-risk populations in Africa, few studies have looked at the adolescent population. Using data from the 2004 National Survey of Adolescents in Uganda, logistic regression models were fitted to examine the odds that HIV/AIDS related knowledge and perceived risk of HIV infection are associated with condom use among adolescents. …

  11. Experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among Ugandan university students

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between the experience of sexual coercion and risky sexual behavior among university students of both sexes in Uganda. In 2005, 980 (80%) out of a total of 1,220 students enrolled in Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda participated in a self-administered questionnaire covering sociodemographic and religious factors, social capital, mental health, alcohol use, and sexual behavior. A validated scale of six items was used to assess the experience of sexual coercion. …

  12. A novel economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among school-going AIDS orphans in rural Uganda

    This study tested an economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among AIDS-orphaned adolescents. Adolescents (n = 96) were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for orphans in Uganda. All adolescents in the study received usual care for AIDS orphans in Uganda, which included peer counseling, health education, and scholastic materials. In addition, experimental adolescents received a family economic intervention, which included a Child/Youth Development Account (CDA) and six 2-hour classes on career planning, career goals, microfinance, and financial well-being. …

  13. Community-based HIV/AIDS education in rural Uganda: which channel is most effective?

    This analysis looks at aáprocess evaluation of four channels of delivery (drama, video, community education and leaflets) used in an Information, Education and Communication (IEC) intervention on HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda. Semi-structured interviews (n=37) and focus groups (n=3) were conducted among field staff. Two questionnaires (n=105 and n=69) and focus groups were conducted with community members. More than 85% of the community had seen at least one drama or video and saw them as relevant and realistic. However, the overall message of the plays was often not well understood. …

  14. Increased sexual abstinence among in-school adolescents as a result of school health education in Soroti district, Uganda

    A health education program conducted in primary schools in Soroti district, Uganda promoted increased access to information, better peer interactions and better quality of the health education system. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among students in their final year of primary school (average age 14 years) at baseline and two years after introduction of the intervention. The percentage of sexually active students decreased from 42.9% (123 out of 287) to 11.1% (31 out of 280) in the intervention arm, while no changes were observed in the control arm. …

  15. Evaluation of a comprehensive school-based AIDS education programme in rural Masaka, Uganda

    This study aimed to evaluate a one-year, comprehensive, school-based HIV and AIDS education program in rural, southwestern Uganda. Twenty intervention schools (1274 students) and 11 control schools (803 students) completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Twelve focus groups were conducted among five of the intervention schools (93 students). Very few effects of the intervention were observed. Focus group data indicates that programmes were not implemented comprehensively and certain activities (how to use condoms, role playing) were only superficially used. …

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