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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Rethinking sexual agency: proposing a multicomponent model based on young people’s life stories

    Sexual health policies explicitly aim to encourage young people to take responsibility for their sexuality to prevent adverse outcomes such as unintended pregnancies, STIs and sexual assault. In Europe and North America, ‘choice’ has become a central concept in sexual and reproductive health policy making. However, the concept of choice is not unproblematic, not least because the cultural emphasis on individual responsibility obscures structural limitations and inequalities, and mutual responsibility between partners. …

  2. Sexuality education. Policy brief number 3

    Policy Brief No. 3 ‘Introducing Sexuality Education: Key Steps for Advocates in Europe and Central Asia’ provides an overview of the most important steps for the introduction (or revision) of national in-school sexuality-education programmes and reviews of existing resources.

  3. Sexuality education in Europe and Central Asia: state of the art and recent developments; an overview of 25 countries. Assessment report

    Sexuality education, which ideally should be comprehensive as well as age- and development-appropriate, is a crucial factor in protecting the health and well-being of children and young people as well as supporting them in their sexual and overall development. The present assessment on the state of sexuality education in Europe and Central Asia was commissioned by the German Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) in close cooperation with the International Planned Parenthood Federation – European Network (IPPF EN). …

  4. The current state of sexuality education in Cyprus, Georgia, Poland, Romania and the Netherlands: insights from a youth perspective

    Aiming to bring attention to the need for Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) and to empower and encourage young leaders to influence their national policies, CHOICE for Youth and Sexuality and YouAct initiated the “Europe for CSE” project, with support from ShareNet. Youth advocates from Cyprus, Georgia, Poland, Romania and the Netherlands joined forces, worked online and met in Amsterdam to set-up concrete advocacy plans at national level, including meetings with volunteers, round tables, online campaigns and reaching out to policy makers and influencers.

  5. Systematic review of the role of external contributors in school substance use education

    Purpose: A literature review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of external contributors (anyone other than a teacher at the school) in delivering school‐based drug, alcohol and tobacco education (substance use education) programmes. Design/methodology/approach: The review focused upon literature published from 1990 onwards in English. Published reports were identified via electronic searches, supplemented by hand searching of relevant journals. Relevant organisations and individuals were contacted to identify low circulation, difficult to acquire (grey) literature. …

  6. The international evidence on the prevention of drug and alcohol use. Summary and examples of implementation in England

    The United Nations Office of Drug Control (UNODC) published ‘International Standards on Drug Use Prevention’ in 2013. The standards were developed through a systematic assessment of the international evidence on prevention and they provide a summary of the available scientific evidence. The briefing provides a summary of the UNODC prevention standards and gives corresponding examples of relevant UK guidelines, programmes and interventions currently available in England. …

  7. Education for pregnant girls and young mothers. Helpdesk report

    How do Kenya, Nigeria and the UK deal with girls who get pregnant at school in terms of: (1) what the policy is around when they should leave school to have their baby, and whether this is actually implemented; (2) whether formal education is provided while they are away having their babies, how this is delivered, and whether it actually has impact on their learning; and (3) the kind of support girls get for going back to school once they have their babies and how negative attitudes are overcome. Additionally: Identify any information on bridging schools in Ghana and Liberia.

  8. Sexuality education. Policy brief No. 2

    This policy brief provides an overview of the impact of good quality sexuality education on the health and well-being of children and young people. The examples in this brief are taken from Europe and Central Asia but they are also relevant to countries outside of these regions.

  9. Sexuality education. Policy brief No. 1

    This policy brief provides an overview of key issues in sexuality education. It focuses primarily on sexuality education in Europe and Central Asia but is also relevant to countries outside of these regions.

  10. Policies for sexuality education in the European Union: note

    The note evaluates the state of play of the provision of sexuality education in the context of schooling and in the context of family planning facilities in 24 European Union Member States. The note compares the situation in the Member States and gives an overview of the points of reflection in relation to sexual and reproductive health and rights.

  11. Leave no one behind: gender, sexuality and the sustainable development goals: evidence report

    In an unprecedented move to eradicate disease, poverty and hunger, world leaders joined together in 2000 to sign into life the hotly contested but broadly agreed upon Millennium Development Goal (MDG) framework. In 2015, as the MDGs come to an end, a new generation of world leaders – government officials, donors and civil society organisations – have joined forces to articulate their vision for a future where all people can contribute to, and benefit from, an inclusive development framework. …

  12. School-based sexuality education in Portugal: strengths and weaknesses

    Portugal, like many other countries, faces obstacles regarding schoolbased sexuality education. This paper explores Portuguese schools’ approaches to implementing sexuality education at a local level, and provides a critical analysis of potential strengths and weaknesses. Documents related to sexuality education in a convenience sample of 89 schools were analysed and findings confirm both the results of the few existing Portuguese studies on the subject and commonalities in sexuality education between Portugal and other European countries. …

  13. Factors associated with teenage pregnancy in the European Union countries: a systematic review

    Background: As part of the REPROSTAT2 project, this systematic review aimed to identify factors associated with teenage pregnancy in 25 European Union countries.Methods: The search strategy included electronic bibliographic databases (1995 to May 2005), bibliographies of selected articles and requests to all country representatives of the research team for relevant reports and publications. Primary outcome measure was conception. Inclusion criteria were quantitative studies of individual-level factors associated with teenage (13–19 years) pregnancy in EU countries. …

  14. A review of scientifically evaluated good practices of preventing and reducing bullying at school in the EU Member States

    The stated ‘general objectives’ set by the European Commission for the ‘Review of Scientifically Evaluated Good Practices on Preventing and Reducing Bullying at School in the EU Member States’ outlined that the contractor should: ‘gather statistical data on the situation on bullying at school in the 15 Member States over the last decade (1990 – 2002)’; ‘describe current crime prevention and intervention policies in Member States targeted at reducing or preventing bullying at school. …

  15. Gender and Sexuality/HIV Education

    Sex/HIV education curricula have disparate effects for females and males. Review of 59 rigorous sex ed evaluations from the U.S. and developing countries. After omitting single sex programs, programs with no effect, and programs that changed only knowledge, 38 remained (25 U.S. and 13 developing country). A third of these failed to disaggregate results by gender, leaving 25. This article looks at why this is the case and how gender affects SRH outcomes.

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