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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. …

  2. Cash transfers: magic bullet or fundamental ingredient?

    Comment on a study published in The Lancet Global Health by Audrey Pettifor and colleagues on cash transfers, school attendance and the reduction of HIV risk behaviours in adolescent girls.

  3. The effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence in young women in rural South Africa (HPTN 068): a phase 3, randomised controlled trial

    Cash transfers have been proposed as an intervention to reduce HIV-infection risk for young women in sub-Saharan Africa. However, scarce evidence is available about their effect on reducing HIV acquisition. The authors aimed to assess the effect of a conditional cash transfer on HIV incidence among young women in rural South Africa. Based on their research findings, the authors draw the conclusion that cash transfers conditional on school attendance did not reduce HIV incidence in young women. School attendance significantly reduced risk of HIV acquisition, irrespective of study group. …

  4. Risk for coerced sex among female youth in Ghana: Roles of family context, school enrollment and relationship experience

    CONTEXT: A better understanding is needed of the variables that may influence the risk of experiencing coerced sex among adolescent females in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: Data were collected from 700 female respondents who were interviewed in 2010 and 2012 waves of a longitudinal study of behavioral risk for HIV infection among youth aged 13–14 or 18–19 and living in two towns in southeastern Ghana. …

  5. Education, HIV, and early fertility: experimental evidence from Kenya

    We provide experimental evidence on the relationships between education, HIV/AIDS education, risky behavior and early fertility in Kenya. We exploit randomly assigned variation in the cost of schooling and in exposure to the national HIV/AIDS prevention curriculum for a cohort of over 19,000 adolescents in Western Kenya, originally aged 13.5 on average. We collected data on the schooling, marriage, and fertility out-comes of these students over 7 years, and tested them for HIV and Herpes (HSV2) after 7 years. …

  6. Economic status, education and risky sexual behavior for urban Botswana women

    This study investigated the relationship between economic status, education and risky sexual behavior for urban Botswana women. The data used are a nationally representative sample from the Botswana AIDS Impact Survey conducted in 2004. An un-weighted sample of 2215 women aged 15-49, who have had sexual intercourse was considered for analysis. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses are used to gain insights into the potential linkages between economic status, education and risky sexual behavior. …

  7. Impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviour of female students in Nigerian schools: Policy implications for scientific and technolgical development

    This study investigated the impact of HIV/AIDS education programmes on sexual behaviors of female students in senior secondary schools in Rivers State of Nigeria. The population for the study comprised of all senior secondary schools female students in Nigeria, which was divided into urban and rural schools. The sample size was 200 female students obtained by using stratified random sampling technique. …

  8. Education and vulnerability: the role of schools in protecting young women and girls from HIV in southern Africa

    Education has a potentially important role to play in tackling the spread of HIV, but is there evidence that this potential is realized? This analysis combines the results of previous literature reviews and updates them with the findings of recent randomized controlled trials and a discussion of possible mechanisms for the effect of schooling on vulnerability to HIV infection. There is a growing body of evidence that keeping girls in school reduces their risk of contracting HIV. …

  9. Comparison of Health Education and STD Risk Reduction Interventions for Incarcerated Adolescent Females

    Adolescent girls imprisoned in state reformatories were recruited (N=246) to an 18-month health education or HIV prevention program. A randomized block design was used to assign girls to one of the two programs. Girls in the HIV prevention program had improved risk reduction and condom use skills. At 9 months of follow-up, girls in both groups reported less sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs and less unprotected sex.

  10. Study of knowledge, perception and attitude of adolescent girls towards STIs/HIV, safer sex and sex education: (A cross sectional survey of urban adolescent school girls in South Delhi, India)

    This cross-sectional study conducted in 2007 in South Delhi, India aimed to assess adolescent school girls' knowledge, attitudes and perceptionsátowards STIs/HIV and safer sex practices and sex education and to explore current sexual behavior. Two hundred and fifty-one female students from two senior secondary schools completed self-administered questionnaires. Over 33% of students did nto have accurate knowledge of the symptoms of STIs other than HIV. …

  11. Research dossier: HIV prevention for girls and young women in Kenya

    This Research Dossier supports the Report Card on HIV Prevention for Girls and Young Women in Kenya produced by the United Nations Global Coalition on Women and AIDS (GCWA). It documents the detailed research coordinated for the GCWA by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), United Nations Program on AIDS (UNAIDS) and Young Positives. The Report Card provides an "at a glance" summary of the current status of HIV prevention strategies and services for girls and young women in Kenya. …

  12. Knowledge and attitudes toward AIDS among female college students in Nagasaki, Japan

    This study assesses knowledge and attitudes concerning HIV infection and individuals with AIDS among 383 female students attending colleges in Nagasaki, Japan. A structured questionnaire containing questions concerning knowledge about AIDS, sources of information, beliefs and attitudes toward people with HIV/AIDS was administered during sessions set up for that purpose. The mean age of participants was 18.8 ± 0.8 years (± SD). The main source of information for AIDS awareness as reported by the students was the mass media. …

  13. What works for women and girls: evidence for HIV/AIDS interventions

    The purpose of www.whatworksforwomen.org is to compile and summarize the base of evidence to support successful interventions in HIV programming for women and girls. National AIDS programs, government ministries, implementing partners, donors, civil society groups and others need an easy-to-understand format for identifying what works for women. …

  14. Facteurs de risque de l'infection à VIH/sida chez la femme

    Ce document étudie les raisons de la situation épidémiologique qui montre une augmentation des cas de sida dans la population hétérosexuelle, avec un pourcentage 3 à 8 fois plus important chez les femmes que chez les hommes. Les auteurs parlent de la plus grande vulnérabilité des femmes vis-à-vis du VIH est due à des facteurs physiologiques et biologiques mais également à des pressions sociales, culturelles et économiques qui ne leur permettent pas d'assurer leur prévention. …

  15. Sexual and Reproductive Health of Young People: Expanding the Research and Program Agenda

    This paper's focuses on areas of relatively poorly addressed or understood aspects of young people's sexual and reproductive health. The authors propose to argue for the need to supplement our knowledge and programmatic interventions with regard to three specific issues related to young people's lives that need attention: (a) an overlooked sub-population of married adolescent girls; (b) an overlooked behavior of sex without consent; (c) programmatic interventions that work (or do not) in enhancing young people's health and development.

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