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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. The impacts of drug policies on children and young people

    As member states of the United Nations take stock of the drug control system, a number of debates have emerged among governments about how to balance international drug laws with human rights, public health, alternatives to incarceration, and experimentation with regulation. This series intends to provide a primer on why governments must not turn a blind eye to pressing human rights and public health impacts of current drug policies.

  2. HIV and young people who inject drugs. Technical brief

    This technical brief is one in a series addressing four young key populations. It is intended for policy-makers, donors, service-planners, service-providers and community-led organizations. This brief aims to catalyse and inform discussions about how best to provide health services, programmes and support for young people who inject drugs. …

  3. Drug prevention programmes in schools: what is the evidence?

    Key messages: Universal drug education programmes in schools have been shown to have an impact on the most common substances used by young people: alcohol, tobacco and cannabis. The approaches which appear to be most effective are those based on social influences and life skills, for example Life Skills Training and Unplugged. Interventions which are not drug-specific but focus on children and young people’s attachment to school can also be effective in reducing substance misuse. The Good Behaviour Game is one example of these. …

  4. Drug education: an entitlement for all a report to government by the advisory group on drug and alcohol education

    Drug And Alcohol Advisory Group – Key Recommendations - Increase parents’ and carers’ knowledge and skills about drug and alcohol education and prevention enabling them to better inform and protect their children; - Improve the quality of drug and alcohol education by making PSHE a statutory subject – to enable schools and colleges to promote well-being effectively, and to improve the quality of training for PSHE teachers; and - Improve identification and support for young people vulnerable to drug misuse in schools, colleges and non-formal settings.

  5. Substance abuse among public secondary school students: prevalence, strategies and challenges for public secondary school managers in Kenya: a case study of Kisumu East sub county

    Substance abuse among public secondary school students is reality that is spreading at an alarming rate. If not checked, it could destroy the youth who are in their formative stage in life. Its outcomes include school dropouts, injuries, loss of lives, destruction of properties, moral decadence, misallocation of resources, indiscipline and compromised academic standards. According to the findings of a study conducted in 2005 on substance abuse in five major cities in Kenya, Kisumu and Nakuru lead the rest of the major cities and towns in the country in the prevalence of substance abuse. …

  6. School-based drug abuse prevention: promising and successful programs

    This document is organized in three chapters. The first presents the risk and protective factors for drug use, the second provides elements of good practice for drug prevention, and the third insists on successful school-based drug prevention programs that target those most at-risk and contribute to reduce drug-related crime. An extensive list of references is available at the end of the publication.

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