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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. How to reach young adolescents: A toolkit for educating 10 - 14 year olds on sexual and reproductive health

    This toolkit was designed to be used by implementors such as experienced programme staff from NGOs, government offices or private industries who want to implement an SRH project for 10-14 year olds enrolled in primary school. The project activities within the toolkit rely on the implementor creating a strong partnership with local schools and community leaders. The toolkit presents several overlapping approaches to increase young adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health knowledge and improve their sexual behaviours.

  2. Lifting the curtain on the conditions of sexual initiation among youth in Ethiopia

    Deriving accurate estimates of the level of sexual coercion is challenging because of the stigma that is attached to the experience. This study examined the effectiveness of a nonverbal response-card method to reduce social desirability bias in reports of the conditions of sexual initiation among youth in southwestern Ethiopia. The conditions surrounding sexual initiation were examined using data from a pilot survey and a final survey of youth ages 13–24 years. …

  3. In a life: linking HIV and sexual and reproductive health in people's lives

    Linking sexual and reproductive health and HIV recognizes the vital role that sexuality plays in people's lives, and the importance of empowering people to make informed choices about their lives, love and intimacy. The real-life stories in this publication reflect the core characteristics and values that IPPF aims for in linking sexual and reproductive health and HIV: evidence-informed programming, a recognition of vulnerability and the full protection of rights. …

  4. Policy and institutional frameworks: mainstreaming adolescent reproductive health (ARH) and gender in HIV/AIDS programs: examples from Ethiopia and Uganda

    This document is divided into six parts (Part I-VI). Part I covers (a) the study background including objectives, methodologies and activities; and (b) an overview of the HIV situation among young people and adolescents in the Africa region. Part II and III present key findings from Ethiopia and Uganda, including a review of policies and the institutional environment in both countries in regards to gender, youth, ARH and HIV/AIDS. Part IV includes key findings of six country assessments of youth issues in the Multi-Sector Programs on HIV/AIDS of the World Bank. …

  5. Supporting the integration of family planning HIV services

    The rationale for integrating family planning/reproductive health (FP/RH) and HIV services, especially in high HIV prevalence settings, has long been apparent: Sexually active individuals are at risk of both unintended pregnancies and HIV. The integration of these two sets of services share the key intended health outcomes of prevention of new HIV infections and prevention of unintended pregnancies. Years of experience in reproductive health settings demonstrate that individuals make greater use of services if they are easy to access. …

  6. Improving the reproductive health of sub-Saharan Africa's youth: a route to achieve the Millennium Development Goals

    This chartbook aims to provide policymakers, program managers, and the interested public in sub-Saharan Africa and around the world with a better understanding of the needs and experiences of youth in the region and how investments in youth can help achieve the MDGs. The data is drawn primarily from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

  7. A journalist's guide to sexual and reproductive health in East Africa

    Sexual and reproductive health encompasses health and well-being in matters related to sexual relations, pregnancies, and births. It deals with the most intimate and private aspects of people's lives, which can be difficult to write about and discuss publicly. As a result, the public misunderstands many sexual and reproductive health matters. In addition, cultural sensitivities and taboos surrounding sexuality often prevent people from seeking information and care and preclude governments from addressing the issues. …

  8. Levels and spread of HIV seroprevalence and associated factors: evidence from national household surveys

    This report summarizes HIV prevalence and the associations between HIV serostatus and key characteristics and behaviors of adult women and men in 22 developing countries, primarily in sub- Saharan Africa. Data come from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and AIDS Indicator Surveys (AIS) conducted between 2001 and 2006. In most of these surveys, nationally representative samples of women age 15-49 and men age 15-59 were tested for HIV. …

  9. Prevention is for life. HIV/AIDS: dispatches from the field

    Although HIV can strike anyone, it is not an equal opportunity virus. Gender inequality, poverty, lack of education and inadequate access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services continue to fuel the epidemic. This booklet will detail how and why prevention works. By applying the principles of prevention to diverse populations around the world, the global community can help slow, and possibly halt, what is proving to be one of the greatest health challenges of our time. …

  10. Youth reproductive and sexual health

    The study provides information on key reproductive and sexual health indicators in young women and men age 15-24 in 38 developing countries. The data come from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and AIDS Indicator Surveys (AIS) conducted between 2001 and 2005. Indicators are selected for the following key areas: background characteristics; adolescent pregnancy; contraception; sexual activity; and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Additional analysis examines the association of various individual and household characteristics with the key indicators.

  11. Advancing reproductive health and family planning through religious leaders and faith-based organizations

    Relationships with FBOs are essential to community-based health work, but can be difficult to forge. Some religious traditions reject the use of contraception. Others may accept family planning within marriage, but do not feel condoms should be distributed to young unmarried people. Some religious leaders believe that prayer is enough to protect their followers from AIDS. …

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