• Twitter
  • RSS

UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

Search resources

The search found 179 results in 0.085 seconds.

Search results

  1. Creating village champions for girls’ education

    Families, communities and village governments are often the key decision-makers regarding girls’ lives. They can also be the most difficult to persuade in terms of delaying girls’ marriages. Their support can ensure that changes initiated by Samata are sustained well after the end of the programme.

  2. Fostering adolescent girl leaders

    At the heart of the Samata intervention is the development of a cadre of adolescent girl leaders who will sustain changes in favour of girls’ education and gender equality in their villages. The programme mentors girls to become confident and vocal young feminists, active in their communities and schools. Samata aims to equip them with the knowledge and skills to effectively negotiate a space that is hostile to women. Overall, the Samata programme has reached 3,600 girls across 69 villages in 2 districts of Bagalkot and Bijapur in northern Karnataka.

  3. Assessment report of health literacy and behavior change practices among adolescent girls in Kibera

    This report presents the findings of a rapid assessment of ‘Health Literacy and Behavior Change Practiced among Adolescent Girls in Kibera’ Informal Settlement in Nairobi, Kenya.

  4. Living free and equal: what states are doing to tackle violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people

    In recent years, local and national authorities in countries around the world have adopted wide-ranging measures to address human rights violations against lesbian, gay, bi, trans (LGBT) and intersex people. The present study references more than 200 such initiatives introduced in 65 countries in every region of the world. While not comprehensive, the study provides an overview of policy trends, highlighting positive developments and drawing attention to areas that require further action.

  5. Rapport relatif à l’éducation à la sexualité : répondre aux attentes des jeunes, construire une société d’égalité femmes-hommes

    La sexualité et les relations intimes et affectives forment une découverte et un apprentissage qui, à tous les âges de la vie, mais plus particulièrement chez les jeunes, soulèvent de nombreuses questions et besoins. Compte-tenu des enjeux posés en matière de citoyenneté, d’égalité femmes-hommes et de santé, il est de la responsabilité des pouvoirs publics de répondre à tou.te.s les jeunes par des informations objectives, sans jugement ni stéréotype, et, lorsqu’elles ou ils en expriment le besoin, de leur apporter l’accompagnement nécessaire.

  6. Promoting health and literacy for women’s empowerment

    The paper discusses the links between health, well-being, women’s empowerment and education, focusing on the role of literacy. It argues that cross-sectoral approaches involving stakeholder collaboration across these three areas will be essential in realizing Sustainable Development Goal 5: to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls’.

  7. Leave no one behind: advancing social, economic, cultural and political inclusion of LGBTI people in Asia and the Pacific - summary

    This summary report shares key findings and recommendations of the forthcoming report, Leave no one behind: Advancing social, economic, cultural and political inclusion of LGBTI people in Asia and the Pacific. The report illustrates the range of measures taken in Asia and the Pacific to advance social, economic, cultural and political inclusion of LGBTI people. It also highlights developments in the key areas of violence protection, education, health, employment, family affairs, legal gender recognition and political participation, as well as noting existing obstacles to further progress. …

  8. We want to learn about good love: findings from a qualitative study assessing the links between comprehensive sexuality education and violence against women and girls

    Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) – including learning about relationships, gender and gender-based violence (GBV), sex, sexuality, and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) – can empower young people to make informed, autonomous decisions regarding their current and future relationships. CSE may also influence a positive shift in social norms which underpin violence against women and girls (VAWG), such as harmful notions of masculinity, and rigid gender roles and stereotypes – both in schools and the wider community. …

  9. On the impact of early marriage on schooling outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa and South West Asia

    This paper examines the effect of age of marriage on women’s schooling outcomes for 36 countries from Sub-Saharan Africa and South West Asia. We employ an instrumental variable approach to account for the endogeneity of early marriage driven by socio-economic and cultural factors. Our results show that delaying early marriage by one year is associated with an increase of half a year of education in Sub- Saharan Africa and nearly one third of a year of education in South West Asia as well as a lower likelihood of dropping out from secondary school of 5.5% in South West Asia.

  10. Feminist Formations

    Articles from this issue : Girls’ schooling, gender equity, and the global education and development agenda: conceptual disconnections, political struggles, and the difficulties of practice, Situating empowerment for millennial schoolgirls in Gujarat, India and Shaanxi, China, engendering agency: the differentiated impact of educational initiatives in Zambia and India, History transformed?: Gender in World War II narratives in U.S. …

  11. Gender tales from Africa: voices of children and women against discrimination

    The collection of these tales aims to provide relevant and experiential case studies for participants in gender-related courses in schools, colleges and universities, as well as in non-formal education settings. Most of the tales were written and tested by facilitators and learners during the annual 'Gender and Development in Southern Africa' course between 1998 and 2000. Several were also tested in a UNICEF workshop on 'Gender, Sexuality and HIV/ AIDS in Education', which was held in Malawi in July 2001. …

  12. Women living with HIV speak out against violence: A collection of essays and reflections of women living with and affected by HIV

    Violence against women and girls is an unacceptable violation of basic human rights. It also is so widespread that ending it must be a global public health priority. An estimated one in three women is beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused by an intimate partner during her lifetime. Intimate partner violence has been shown to increase the risk of HIV infection by around 50%, and violence (and the fear of violence) deters women and girls from seeking services for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support.

  13. Hear our voices

    Thousands of girls claim they are embarrassed and ashamed to express the everyday injustices and threats of sexual violence they face, in ‘Hear Our Voices’ - one of the largest studies of adolescent girls’ rights of its kind. Plan International spoke directly with more than 7,000 girls and boys aged 12 to 16 in 11 countries across the world, as part of its Because I am a Girl campaign for girls’ rights. The study’s results bring the daily realities of girls into vivid colour. …

  14. The need for quality sexual and reproductive health education to address barriers to girls’ educational outcomes in South Africa

    South Africa has made significant strides in enrolling girls in school, particularly at the basic education level, with high gender parity indexes (GPI) at the primary school level. However, the high attrition rate at the secondary level and the poor quality of educational experiences and learning opportunities, for girls in particular, remain areas of concern. …

  15. Because I am a girl: The state of the world's girls 2014. Pathways to power: Creating sustainable change for adolescent girls

    This is the eighth in the annual ‘Because I am a Girl’ report series, published by Plan, which assesses the current state of the world’s girls. While women and children are recognised in policy and planning, girls’ needs and rights are often ignored. The reports provide evidence, including the voices of girls themselves, as to why they need to be treated differently from boys and adult women. They also use information from primary research, in particular a small study set up in 2006 following 142 girls from nine countries. …

Pages

Our mission

Supporting education ministries, researchers and practitioners through a comprehensive database, website and information service.